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Cologne, Germany, Jan. 2012 - Pedestrians navigate stairs on Heinrich-Böll-Platz, in front of the Cologne Dom Cathedral in Cologne, Germany. Officially, Hohe Domkirche St. Peter und Maria (or The High Cathedral of Saints Peter and Mary), is a Roman Catholic church in Cologne, Germany. It is the seat of the Archbishop of Cologne and the administration of the Archdiocese of Cologne. It is renowned monument of German Catholicism and Gothic architecture and is a World Heritage Site. It is Germany's most visited landmark, attracting an average of 20,000 people a day. The Cologne Cathedral was built between 1248 and 1880. It is 144.5 meters (474 ft) long, 86.5 m (284 ft) wide and its towers are approximately 157 m (515 ft) tall. The cathedral is the largest Gothic church in Northern Europe and has the second-tallest spire and largest facade of any church in the world. The choir has the largest height to width ratio of any medieval church. (Photo © Jock Fistick)
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PHOTO © JOCK FISTICK
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Cologne
Cologne, Germany, Jan. 2012 -  Pedestrians navigate stairs on Heinrich-Böll-Platz, in front of the Cologne Dom Cathedral in Cologne, Germany. Officially, Hohe Domkirche St. Peter und Maria (or The High Cathedral of Saints Peter and Mary), is a Roman Catholic church in Cologne, Germany. It is the seat of the Archbishop of Cologne and the administration of the Archdiocese of Cologne. It is renowned monument of German Catholicism and Gothic architecture and is a World Heritage Site. It is Germany's most visited landmark, attracting an average of 20,000 people a day. The Cologne Cathedral was built between 1248 and 1880. It is 144.5 meters (474 ft) long, 86.5 m (284 ft) wide and its towers are approximately 157 m (515 ft) tall. The cathedral is the largest Gothic church in Northern Europe and has the second-tallest spire and largest facade of any church in the world. The choir has the largest height to width ratio of any medieval church. (Photo © Jock Fistick)